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Roseville, California

Tax ID 82-4912215

Courage To Speak Up For Those Forgotten…



Social Justice Is…

Having Courage To Speak Up For Those Forgotten…


Being a catalyst of change requires strong influencers who stand on lasting values that the good news of the gospel presents.


God’s Great Love Changes Everything!


Bringing my Lord’s presence into a domain (prisons) that the enemy has held captive for centuries is daunting, but worthy of the challenge because after meeting hundreds of prisoners, they’re beloveds just like you and me who have made horrible mistakes and deserve a second chance.


Most prisoners develop a deep and sincere desire to change their life circumstances through hope and motivation from family, friends and/or religion. Focusing on this link and alternatives opens many doorways of opportunities in having goals filled with lifestyle changes.


“Sometimes the heart sees what is invisible to the eye.”

H. Jackson Brown Jr.


Prisons are set up for punishment, profit and containment. Prisoners need hope, motivation and rehabilitation.


Could you be caged up like an animal and live in close quarters with hundreds, if not thousands, of others and accept being told what to do, what to eat, what to wear, when to sleep, when to wake up, when to work, when to shower and when to talk to loved ones on the phone, while being surrounded by criminal conduct and make sound decisions once released?


You might begrudgingly say they’re lucky to have a cage to live in and food in their bellies after committing their crime, but…


How is that teaching them the power to rewrite their stories, you know, through recasting the drama and redirecting their actions?


Having the opportunity to impact their lives is the greatest reward possible and one in which requires softening up great opposition.


Discrimination, racism and negative social policies and laws have labeled returning citizens “once a felon, always a felon.” This caters to the belief and reason why our recidivism rates are so high.


When we force our returning citizens into this category, we wonder why they recommit and/or become homeless.


We are what we believe, and when we’re told over and over that we’re bad and menaces to society, it’s no wonder we find ourselves living under the spell of deceit and lies.


Good decision-making skills requires options. Surviving in prison surrounded by criminal conduct pretty much means association with the wrong crowd. It’s hard to make good choices when there are minimal options available to us. That requires many opportunities.


Prisons are full of beloveds who lack support, encouragement and visitation from loved ones.


Could you sustain hope and peace of mind without a covering of love?


When I was rejected and unloved, my decision-making skills needed help, too. Every decision I made was based on fear. That’s all I knew.


When you’re surrounded by criminal conduct, and most decisions are already laid out for you, without a covering of love, there is no hope or reason to strive forward in making changes.


Strong support and dedication is a rare and unique gift of hope that all incarcerated need.


Reentry process is more like a survival process. Survival of the fittest! This is why it’s imperative to surround ourselves with people who are going to lift us higher.


How can we expect our returning citizens to be productive members of society when we judge, ridicule and turn our backs on them? That doesn’t influence them to become better individuals, become assets to our communities or even make our communities safer.


Unconditional acts of kindness and love opens doorways to new lives and behaviors.


During times of challenge, frustration and failure, knowing that someone believes in you helps you try again. Introducing others to the love of Jesus provides this comfort in faith.


Every day we have the opportunity to make a positive difference in the lives of others. Replacing discrimination with rehabilitation and hate with love will restore precious lives and teach us a thing or two about ourselves, too.




Prisoners need society to understand, I am more than my mistakes!


Until next time…

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